A 48-year-old worker was killed by an overturned lorry while employed under J & H Construction Ltd.

Leicester Crown Court heard that the victim was operating a mini digger on 3 October 2006 when a nearby lorry tipper that was delivering roughly 20 tonnes of aggregate overturned on uneven ground and crushed his vehicle, killing him instantly.

According to Health and Safety Executive (HSE) inspectors, the man’s death was the result of a failure to properly assess tipping operations. The tipping area where the incident took place was not yet determined safe for operations and was subject to poor preparation and insufficient leveling.

“This death could have been prevented if deliveries had been properly planned,” said HSE inspector Frances Bailey. “It is well known that tipper lorries can overturn, especially on sloping or uneven ground and it is vital that people are kept a safe distance.”

J & H Construction Ltd. was fined £50,000 and ordered to pay £20,000 in costs after pleading guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974.

J H Hallam (Contracts) Ltd. — the firm subcontracting the victim’s employer at the time — was fined £80,000 and ordered to pay £20,000 in costs after pleading guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974.

“This has been a long and complex investigation,” Bailey later added. “However the result will hopefully serve as a warning to others to review their arrangements for deliveries and avoid similar tragic incidents in the future.”

We share similar thoughts with the HSE inspector in hoping that others will learn from this tragic event. The importance of having trained individuals at a work site cannot be stressed enough.

Didac Dumper Training equips people with comprehensive knowledge of dumper truck operations. Delegates on the Dumper Course learn essentials of safe practice such as banksman signaling, truck maintenance, dumper stability, pre-use safety checks, and — most relevant to this particular incident — maneuvering on level and rough terrain.

Article Source: Health and Safety Executive